Amie Richmond - Daily Express Article

Weight loss diet UPDATE: Exercise is NOT the most important factor in slimming down

THERE ARE a variety of factors that can impact a person’s physique, but some have more weight than others.

By Lizzie Mulherin

PUBLISHED: PUBLISHED: 22:30, Wed, Dec 14, 2016

While weight loss and exercise can go hand in hand in some instances, a gruelling fitness regime on its own will not guarantee slimming results.

From extreme boot camps to workouts from suspended rope, health-seeking hopefuls have gone to great lengths in a bid to banish unwanted pounds.

But the focus has been misdirected, according to weight loss expert and nutritionist at www.bodychef.com Amie Richmond.

Amie said: “When embarking on a fat or weight loss programme the first question you should always ask yourself is ‘do I want to be thin or do I want to be healthy?’

“We’ve all heard the phrase ‘you can’t out train a bad diet’ and it’s true. In the long term putting your health first requires fuelling your body with the right nutrients, which is the most beneficial way to maintain a healthy weight and achieve your goals.”

Many experts say only 30 per cent of any weight loss or diet regime is due to exercise. A staggering 70 per cent, however, is down to what you eat.

Amie continued: “Whilst diet and exercise are both important for your overall health and wellbeing, particularly when starting your weight loss plan, It is vital that food habits change in order to see real lasting change.”

According to the weight loss expert, the first step to achieving slimming goals is being realistic.

This means ditching extreme diets of any kind – including crash diets – in favour of healthy, balanced meals which include protein, carbohydrates and good fats.

She explained: “Losing weight too quickly by under-eating, over-exercising or skipping meals can lead to excess skin folds on the body where it has shrunk too quickly.

”Extreme exercising can also put increased pressure on your adrenal glands and can end up stressing your body with high cortisol levels, which in turn can lead to future health problems.”

It’s also favourable to eat seasonally, the nutritionist advised.

Amie said: “Choose a food plan based on real food, as near to nature as you can. Opt for seasonal fruits and vegetables as these are the most nutrient dense and low in calories.

“Try and achieve a ‘colourful’ plate with a variety of vegetables in each meal, such as beetroot, sweet potato and spinach.

“Eating three nutritious meals a day with two small snacks is ideal as this ensures your blood sugar levels do not drop suddenly leading to impulse eating of sugary foods.”

Amie said it’s also important to ditch sugar, monitor your salt intake and carefully check the labels of your food so you know what you are consuming.